Trigeminal Nerve Stimulator in Depression, Epilepsy

Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation an Option for ADHD?
May 20, 2013
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/804440
Currently, the system has no approvals in the United States from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
Leon Ekchian, president and   CEO of NeuroSigma, Inc, said the company plans first to apply for the epilepsy indication in the United States, with depression next and ADHD   indications probably further down the road.

EU Approval for Nerve Stimulator in Depression, Epilepsy
Emma Hitt, PhD
Sep 07, 2012
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/770512

An external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) system (Monarch, NeuroSigma, Inc) has received European Union (EU) CE Certification for the adjunctive treatment of epilepsy and major depressive disorder for adults and children aged 9 years and older.

The device has been evaluated in clinical trials conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Southern California. It consists of an external pulse generator and disposable electric patches placed on the forehead that are replaced daily and are worn primarily during sleep.

NeuroSigma, Inc.
http://www.neurosigma.com

Seizures can impair memory and thinking

With Epilepsy Treatment, The Goal Is To Keep Kids Seizure-Free
June 10, 2013
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/06/10/188639089/with-epilepsy-treatment-the-goal-is-to-keep-kids-seizure-free

frequent or prolonged seizures can eventually cause problems with memory and thinking.

seizures “can actually change the way language centers in the brain develop.”

low-carbohydrate diets, including the high-fat ketogenic diet

Then there are new implanted devices that send electrical signals to the vagus nerve

to provide parents and other caregivers with an emergency kit that lets them administer a fast-acting drug to stop a seizure.

“Epilepsy surgery is underutilized in this country,”

For about 30 percent of children with epilepsy, none of the existing treatments is adequate.

transplanting a type of cell that reduces excessive electrical activity in the brain. “Stem Cell therapy may be one way that we can very specifically target the region of the brain that is overexcited and quiet that area of the brain.”

Another experimental approach involves devices that monitor the brain for abnormal activity.
Some are able to predict when the brain activity is headed toward a seizure, Fureman says, “and actually deliver stimulation that shuts down that seizure activity.”