Text Complexity with Carol Jago

Text Complexity with Carol Jago
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCR5sQc4fIs3sfxMYfj942ag
2014

Text complexity is something all teachers struggle with when selecting reading for their class. They can look at lexile levels, but that doesn’t always represent that text complexity or deeper meaning of the text.

Consultant Carol Jago discusses the considerations for navigating text complexity in this excerpt from one of a series of on-demand, point-of-use professional development podcasts available in Journeys Common Core, Grades K-6, Collections, Grades 6-12, and HMH Professional Development Services courses.

related:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2019/01/12/lexile-framework-for-reading

Lexile® Framework for Reading

What does the Lexile® measure mean?https://cdn.lexile.com/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/WhatDoestheLexileMeasureMean.pdf

There are two Lexile measures:
the Lexile reader measure and the Lexile text measure.

A Lexile measure is based on two strong predictors of how difficult a text is to comprehend:
word frequency and sentence length.
Many other factors affect the relationship between a reader and a book, including its content, the age and interests of the reader, and the design of the actual book.

https://lexile.com/educators/measuring-growth-with-lexile/lexile-measures-grade-equivalents

https://lexile.com/educators/find-books-at-the-right-level/find-books-beginning-readers

https://lexile.com/educators/tools-to-support-reading-at-school

related:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2019/06/08/text-complexity-with-carol-jago
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The Tale of Peter Rabbit
https://fab.lexile.com/book/details/9780590411011
AD660L
cabbages
peeped
sparrows
buns
rake
naughty
pea
sneezed
scarecrow
doorstep
————-
brass
frame
tale
dump
umbrella
hut

The Need to Read (WSJ, 2016)

Ideas > The Saturday Essay
The Need to Read
Reading books remains one of the best ways to engage with the world, become a better person and understand life’s questions, big and small
By Will Schwalbe
Nov. 25, 2016
https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-need-to-read-1480083086

Continuous Learning
The 5-Hour Rule Used by Bill Gates, Jack Ma and Elon Musk
The most successful people on the planet are also the people likeliest to devote an hour a day to reading and learning.
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/317602

Most middle schoolers can’t tell native ads from articles

Students Have ‘Dismaying’ Inability To Tell Fake News From Real, Study Finds
November 23, 2016
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/23/503129818/study-finds-students-have-dismaying-inability-to-tell-fake-news-from-real

“Many assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally savvy about what they find there,” the researchers wrote. “Our work shows the opposite.”

Most students could identify the traditional ad, but more than 80 percent of them believed that the “sponsored content” article was a real news story.

…young people tended to credulously accept information as presented even without supporting evidence or citations.

Activity and Imagined Activity

Activity and Imagined Activity Can Enhance Young Children’s Reading Comprehension
Arthur M. Glenberg, et al.
Journal of Educational Psychology 96 (2004): 424–36.

This study describes an experiment in which young children read a passage and manipulate plastic figures so that they can portray the actions and relationships in the passage. By manipulating the figures, the children get a structured, embodied experience with a clear goal (portray the action in the text). After some practice doing this, the children were asked to simply imagine manipulating the figures. This is a request to engage in simulation in their heads. As a posttest, the children read a final passage without any prompting.

Children who completed the sequence of embodied experience then simulation were better at remembering and drawing inferences about the new passage, as compared to children who received no training. They were better as well, compared to children who were instructed to only imagine the passage.
And, most interestingly, they were better compared to children who manipulated the figures without the intermediate instructions to imagine manipulating.
Encouraging simulation through the initial use of physical enactment helped the children learn a new reading comprehension strategy, namely a strategy whereby they called on their experiences in the world to build simulations for understanding a text in specific ways.

cited by:
Gee, James Paul. “Learning and Games.
The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. Edited by Katie Salen. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 21–40.
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2015/11/01/the-ecology-of-games