The Benefits of Restlesness

The Benefits of Restlesness
2005
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4675356

I believe that curiosity, wonder and passion are defining qualities of imaginative minds

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You do the best you can

Adapting to the Possibilities of Life
by Donald Rosenstein, MD
April 27, 2008
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89920017

I believe in adaptation — that is, the same stimulus does not invariably elicit the same response over time.

The first time I saw my son flap his arms, I nearly threw up.
My son Koby was 2 at the time, and he and my wife and I were at an evening luau in Hawaii. Dancers emerged from the dark twirling torches to loud, rhythmic drumbeats. I thought it was exciting and so did Koby. He began to flap his arms — slowly, at first, and then with an intensity that mirrored the movement of the dancers.
In an instant, I was overwhelmed. I knew just enough about arm-flapping to know that it was characteristic of autism. I was confused, panicked and strangely preoccupied with the fear that I would never play tennis with my son as I had with my father.

I believe that “reframing a problem” can help to overcome it. But adaptation is not the same as becoming tolerant of or inured to something. Adaptation allows for creative possibilities.

before he adapted to his son’s illness, he wouldn’t always know how to respond when his very sick patients would tell him, I just don’t know what to do. Now his answer is, you do the best you can.

related:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6115760

this I believe: Brian Eno

this I believe
Singing: The Key To A Long Life
by Brian Eno
November 23, 2008
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97320958

I believe that singing is the key to long life, a good figure, a stable temperament, increased intelligence, new friends, super self-confidence, … and a better sense of humor. A recent long-term study conducted in Scandinavia sought to discover which activities related to a healthy and happy later life.
Three stood out: camping, dancing and singing.

psychological benefits: Singing aloud leaves you with a sense of levity and contentedness.
And then there are what I would call “civilizational benefits.” When you sing with a group of people, you learn how to subsume yourself into a group consciousness because a capella singing is all about the immersion of the self into the community.
That’s one of the great feelings — to stop being me for a little while and to become us. That way lies empathy, the great social virtue.

You want songs that are word-rich, but also vowel-rich because it’s on the long vowels sounds of a song such as “Bring It On Home To Me” (“You know I’ll alwaaaaays be your slaaaaave”), that’s where your harmonies really express themselves. And when you get a lot of people singing harmony on a long note like that, it’s beautiful.

the other thing that you have to harmonize besides pitch and rhythm is tone.
To be able to hit exactly the same vowel sound at a number of different pitches seems unsurprising in concept, but is beautiful when it happens.

Eno’s Group-Sing Song List:

Can’t Help Falling In Love (Elvis Presley)
Love Me Tender
Keep On the Sunny Side
Sixteen Tons (Tennessee Ernie Ford)
Will the Circle Be Unbroken
Dream
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dream_(song)

If I Had a Hammer
Love Hurts
I’ll Fly Away
Down By the Riverside
Chapel of Love
Wild Mountain Thyme
Que Sera, Sera

Cotton Fields

related:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2013/06/09/imperfect-harmony-how-singing-with-others-changes-your-life