Steve Reich & speech melody

Steve Reich at 80: The Phases Of A Lifetime In Music
October 9, 2016
http://www.npr.org/sections/deceptivecadence/2016/10/09/496552301/steve-reich-at-80-the-phases-of-a-lifetime-in-music

Reich has continued to find music in speech, hearing melody in the flow of words. “I mean, what tells you more about a person, a photograph of them, or a recording of their voice?” the composer says.

The melody of the human voice became one of Reich’s signatures. He quotes Czech composer Leos Janáček: “Speech melody is like a water lily whose roots go down into the bottom of the soul.”

Music: a shorthand for emotion

‘How Did This Song Get In That Commercial?’ Some Answers From SXSW
March 24, 2016
http://www.npr.org/2016/03/24/471759481/how-did-this-song-get-in-that-commercial-some-answers-from-sxsw

“I think what music does is gives you a shorthand for emotion,” Hansa says. “If you don’t want to talk, or have a commercial where it’s just words, words, words, what songs can do is get you from Point A to Point B and connect with an audience quicker.”

Sometimes when the music is right, you don’t need words at all. Paoletta used to write for Billboard magazine before coming to Comma Music. He looks back to a song that broke through in this way over 10 years ago: “Days Go By” by Dirty Vegas. It was used in a Mitsubishi ad in 2002.

Rhythm: Accent & Syncopation

Rhythm: Accent & Syncopation
Howard Goodall
2006

Goodall traces the roots of syncopation back to Africa, long before the West could grasp the concept, and explains the evolution of the shifting of accents in Western music using Philip Glass‘s “Akhenaten” vs. Handel’s “Zadok the Priest” to illustrate.