Expressive power of a language

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expressive_power_(computer_science)

related:
Does It Taste As Sweet To Say ‘I Love You’ In Another Language?
February 1, 2014
http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/02/01/269014409/does-it-taste-as-sweet-to-say-i-love-you-in-another-language
For intimate expressions — praying, lying, expressing anger, showing affection, even cursing — our native language is usually our strongest, says Boston University professor of psychology Catherine Harris.

Colm Toibin on Elizabeth Bishop

Colm Toibin on Poet Elizabeth Bishop
May 10, 2015
http://www.ttbook.org/book/colm-toibin-poet-elizabeth-bishop-1

The celebrated Irish novelist Colm Toibin talks about his admiration for the poet Elizabeth Bishop and the kinship he feels for her.

01:45 confessional, autobiographical poems

02:46 her poems are canonical

4:34 people are very careful about what they say
people hint at things rather than declare them
language of restraint … everything is understated

07:40 we live in an age where you’re meant to–even with the most casual acquaintance–sit down and tell them all about how you’re feeling this week

08:10 somehow speech is not accurate enough, language is not clear enough

related:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/overcoming-the-language-barrier-as-a-brit-in-america

Language and music: same syntactical neural circuits

Art Tatum

Jazz Music Activates Some Language Centers of Brain
Science. 19 February 2014
http://news.sciencemag.org/brain-behavior/2014/02/scienceshot-jazz-music-activates-some-language-centers-brain

As most jazz lovers know, the high point of a concert is when the musicians let loose and improvise, “talking” to each other with their instruments.
Indeed, modern jazz owes a lot of its appeal to pioneers like pianist Art Tatum (photo above) who introduced improvisation into the art form.
Scientists have long suspected links in the brain between music and language, although just what they are isn’t clear.

In a new study, researchers recruited 11 professional jazz pianists to engage in sessions of what musicians call “trading fours”—a form of improvisation in which two soloists alternate playing four bars of music each, riffing off of each other’s spontaneous creations.
The musicians took turns having their brains scanned with a functional magnetic resonance imaging machine while playing on an all-plastic keyboard (metal parts would be attracted to the fMRI’s powerful magnet), while their partners played within earshot. The scans showed that during the sessions, parts of the brain linked to language syntax—the structural way that words are put together to make sentences—were activated; but brain areas linked to language semantics—the actual meaning of words and sentences—were suppressed.
The team concludes today in PLOS ONE that language and music partly overlap in the brain because they both employ the same syntactical neural circuits, but communicate meaning in very different ways: language verbally, and music nonverbally.
This may be why music lovers often feel keenly that they know what the musician is saying, but can’t put it into words.

related:

September 10, 2014
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2015/07/21/this-is-your-brain-on-music