Allulose

In The Search For The Perfect Sugar Substitute, Another Candidate Emerges
August 25, 2015
http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/08/25/434597445/in-the-hunt-for-the-perfect-sugar-substitute-another-candidate-emerges

allulose. “This is a rare sugar. A sugar that’s found in nature,” Harrison explains.

Chemically speaking, it’s almost identical to ordinary sugar. It has the same chemical formula as fructose and glucose, but the atoms of hydrogen and oxygen are arranged slightly differently.

And that slight difference means that my body won’t turn this sugar into calories.

IOM. Smart Snack

Guess What Makes The Cut As A ‘Smart Snack’ In Schools? Hot Cheetos
March 28, 2015
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2015/03/26/395598079/guess-what-makes-the-cut-as-a-smart-snack-in-schools-hot-cheetos

These aren’t just any Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. They’re a reformulated version with less fat, less salt and more whole grains. But is that really what the scientists at the Institute of Medicine had in mind when they wrote the recommendations that would become the Smart Snack rules?

In Chicago, schools get a 20 percent commission on all sales.

Beef industry & growth-promotion drugs

Inside The Beef Industry’s Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs
August 21, 2013
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/21/214202886/inside-the-beef-industrys-battle-over-growth-promotion-drugs

When the drug company Merck Animal Health announced plans to suspend sales of its Zilmax feed additive last week, many observers were shocked.

Yet concern about Zilmax and the class of growth-promotion drugs called beta agonists has been building for some time. In an interesting twist, the decisive pressure on Zilmax did not come from animal welfare groups or government regulators: It emerged from within the beef industry itself, and from academic exper ts who have long worked as consultants to the industry.

Among them is Temple Grandin, a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. Grandin, whose life is the subject of an HBO biopic, has redesigned slaughterhouses to make them more humane.

Around the summer of 2006, she says, she started seeing a new kind of problem among the cattle, especially when the weather got really hot. “You had animals that were stiff and sore-footed, animals that were reluctant to move,” she recalls. “They act like the floor is red-hot. They don’t want to put their feet down. And I had never seen these kinds of symptoms before, ever!”

The problems, she says, affect as many as 1 out of every 5 animals. She’s become increasingly convinced that the problems result from the drugs called beta agonists.

related:
July 8, 2013
http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2013/07/08/199168194/EU-U-S-Trade-A-Tale-Of-Two-Farms
He says there are philosophical differences when it comes to genetically modified crops

September 29, 2009
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113314725
cows wear a patch behind their ear, which releases a synthetic growth hormone.

You’re Probably Eating Wood Pulp

From McDonald’s To Organic Valley, You’re Probably Eating Wood Pulp
July 10, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/07/10/329767647/from-mcdonalds-to-organic-valley-youre-probably-eating-wood-pulp

Do not be alarmed, but you may be eating wood pulp.
Or at least an additive that started out as wood.

If you buy shredded cheeses, including brands such as Organic Valley and Sargento, or hit the drive-through at McDonald’s for a breakfast sandwich or a smoothie, or douse some ribs with bottled barbecue sauce, there’s likely some cellulose that’s been added to your food.

Cellulose is basically plant fiber, and one of the most common sources is wood pulp.
Manufacturers grind up the wood and extract the cellulose.

Whales, Dolphins Are Collateral Damage

A sperm whale entangled in a drift net.

Whales, Dolphins Are Collateral Damage In Our Taste For Seafood
January 08, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/01/07/260555381/thousands-of-whales-dolphins-killed-to-satisfy-our-seafood-appetite

Hundreds of thousands of marine mammals are injured or killed every year by fishermen around the world.
And because most seafood in the U.S. is imported, that means our fish isn’t as dolphin-friendly as you might expect.

related:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2013/08/19/dolphin-deaths-alarm-scientists