Two-factor experiments with interactions

molasses_vs_honeyTwo-factor experiments with interactions
(Taste results: 1=bad, 10=exceptional
A= baking time
B= sugar type)

When the lines are not parallel, this is evidence of interaction:
The effect of sugar type depends on the duration that it is baked for.

Definition of “interaction”:
The effect of one factor depends on the value (or the level) of another factor.

from the MOOC:
Experimentation for Improvement
McMaster University
https://www.coursera.org/course/experiments

baking_time

Make Magic Mud – From a Potato!

How To Make Magic Mud – From a Potato!
Grant Thompson – “The King of Random”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0J4dRqg7CE

… potatoes can be chopped up and soaked to leach out the starch, of course the first thing I thought of was making oobleck. My mind was blown when I experimented with this process, and realized the starch would collect at the bottom of the dish, and would stay in place when the water and impurities were poured out.

After only a couple of rinses, it’s amazing to see how pure the starch powder can be. It looks exactly like cornstarch that could be purchased at the store.

I was familiar with the idea of making tonic water glow under UV light, so wondered how it would mix with the starch powder. The result was very gratifying!

 

Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space
November 19, 2013
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/11/20/246244688/first-satellite-developed-by-high-schoolers-sent-into-space

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

The 2-pound TJ3Sat was built by about 50 students over the past seven years at the public Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Va., working with volunteers from its corporate sponsor, Orbital Sciences.

The satellite is designed to receive messages the students send into space, and it will then rebroadcast those messages using radio waves that can be heard around the globe via ham radio. (Listeners should be able to tune into the messages at 437.32 MHz +/- 0.013, according to the team.) The satellite’s voice synthesizer will interpret lines of text phonetically, meaning that with slight tweaks in word structure, the messages can be ‘spoken’ in any language.”

“In a class of nanosatellites known for their distinctive cube shape, the TJCubeSat is about the size of a Pop-Tarts box, small enough to fit in the palm of a hand and weighing about two pounds. The satellite is expected to orbit the Earth from an altitude of about 310 miles.”

related video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpezbkjVIiU