95 of professors: above-average

Screen Shot 2015-02-13 at 5.07.29 PM95%

Proportion of US professors who think they are above-average educators.

from:
01.02 What is Important About Feedback?
University of Michigan
February 2015
https://class.coursera.org/clinicalskills-002/lecture/17

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The Optimism Bias

The Optimism Bias: Human Brain May Be Hardwired for Hope
By Tali Sharot
TIME. May 28, 2011
http://content.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2074067,00.html

We like to think of ourselves as rational creatures. We watch our backs, weigh the odds, pack an umbrella. But both neuroscience and social science suggest that we are more optimistic than realistic. On average, we expect things to turn out better than they wind up being. People hugely underestimate their chances of getting divorced, losing their job or being diagnosed with cancer; expect their children to be extraordinarily gifted; envision themselves achieving more than their peers; and overestimate their likely life span (sometimes by 20 years or more).

The belief that the future will be much better than the past and present is known as the optimism bias. It abides in every race, region and socioeconomic bracket. Schoolchildren playing when-I-grow-up are rampant optimists, but so are grownups: a 2005 study found that adults over 60 are just as likely to see the glass half full as young adults.

Collectively we can grow pessimistic — about the direction of our country or the ability of our leaders to improve education and reduce crime. But private optimism, about our personal future, remains incredibly resilient.
A survey conducted in 2007 found that while 70% thought families in general were less successful than in their parents’ day, 76% of respondents were optimistic about the future of their own family.

example:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2013/12/27/people-have-short-term-memories

for more on depression and reality:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/06/01/you-your-brain-julian-keenan