Job crafting

How To Build A Better Job
March 29, 2016
http://www.npr.org/2016/03/28/471859161/how-to-build-a-better-job

Why do you work? Are you just in it for the money or do you do it for a greater purpose? Popular wisdom says your answer depends on what your job is. But psychologist Amy Wrzesniewski at Yale University finds it may have more to do with how we think about our work. Across groups such as secretaries and custodians and computer programmers, Wrzesniewski finds people about equally split in whether they say they have a “job,” a “career” or a “calling.”
… how we find meaning and purpose at work.

Job crafting: what employees do to redesign their own jobs in ways that foster engagement at work, job satisfaction, resilience, and thriving.”
Berg, Wrzesniewski, & Dutton, 2010

November 10, 2014
Dr. Amy Wrzesniewski, professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management

Job crafting takes 3 forms:

  1. Task crafting: alter number, type, nature of tasks
  2. Relational crafting
  3. Cognitive crafting: alter how one perceives tasks and their meaning

===============

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/08/473277814/the-larger-than-life-legend-of-the-ballpark-aisles

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/the-exact-same-experience-good-or-bad-depending

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2016/06/28/person-environment-fit

cited by:

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2016/09/25/our-loss-of-wisdom

ABC of human motivation & video games

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What’s It Doing To Us?
February 11, 2013
http://www.npr.org/2013/02/11/171698919/video-game-violence-why-do-we-like-it-and-whats-it-doing-to-us

RPGs, or role-playing games. She says for the most part, they’re less violent than “first-person shooters” like Call of Duty.

If you want to create a good narrative, you need to create conflict, and violence is a really easy way to create conflict,” she says.

Iowa State University professor Douglas Gentile, who studies the effects of violent video games on children, says violent games tap into a primal instinct.
“There are two things that force us to pay attention,” Gentile says. “One is violence; the other is sex. Whenever either of those are present in our environment, they have survival value for us.”

Gentile explains that there is a very basic reason that a lot of people think violent games are more exciting than say, Tetris.

“These gamers do have an adrenaline rush, and it’s noradrenaline and it’s testosterone, and it’s cortisol — these are the so-called stress hormones,” Gentile says. “That’s exactly the same cocktail of hormones you drop into your bloodstream if I punched you.”
Getting punched in real life? Not fun.
“But when you know you’re safe, having that really heightened sense of stress can be fun,” Gentile says.

He says there’s an A, B and C of human motivations, and video games hit all three:

A is for Autonomy: “You’re holding a controller, so you are in control,” Gentile says.

B is for Belonging: “If you play with other people or have friends who play the same game or who play online, you also are meeting your belonging needs,” Gentile says.

And C is for competence: “[Games] often train you how to play as you’re playing, and so you start feeling competent,” Gentile says.

Which brings us to a decades-old question: Do violent video games make people more violent?

Gentile says that his research shows that children who play more violent games by and large behave more aggressively. But, he adds, that doesn’t necessarily mean school shootings.

VGS 54 – Dr. Douglas Gentile explains how violent video games affect the brain
May 6, 2016

~25 hostile attribution bias {because they’re friends}

~26 Games that don’t affect us: we call them boring

~27:30 immediate feedback
lots of opportunities for practice, with the goal that they master the skill -> it becomes automatic

31:30 pro-social games
Sims
animal crossing
community-building

Of course games affect us. When something doesn’t affect us, we call it “boring”

You need motivational support to turn knowledge into action

Behavior Change Techniques in Top-Ranked Mobile Apps for Physical Activity
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 46(6): 649–652, June 2014
David E. Conroy, PhD, et al.
http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(14)00040-3/abstract

Methods:
Top-ranked apps (n=167) were identified on August 28, 2013, and coded using the Coventry, Aberdeen and London–Revised (CALO-RE) taxonomy of behavior change techniques during the following month.

Conclusions:
Behavior change techniques are not widely marketed in contemporary physical activity apps.
Based on the available descriptions and functions of the observed techniques in contemporary health behavior theories, people may need multiple apps to initiate and maintain behavior change.

journalistic version:
Most Fitness Apps Don’t Use Proven Motivational Techniques
May 06, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/05/06/310136269/most-fitness-apps-dont-use-proven-motivational-techniques
“You need motivational support to turn that knowledge into action,” says David Conroy, a kinesiology professor at Penn State who led the study

related:

4 Proven Ways to Increase Your Motivation to Exercise
July 2016
http://time.com/4410412/increase-motivation-exercise

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2015/10/05/personal-life-contracts

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/01/16/169524178/skin-doctors-question-accuracy-of-apps-for-cancer-risk

Hedonic treadmill

Salary Level May Not Indicate Contentment
December 16, 2005
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5056509

Mr. CLEMENTS: the research says is that there’s this youth curve in happiness.
You know, people tend to be reasonably happy in their 20s, they get less and less happy through their 30s, they hit bottom in their 40s, and then they tend to rebound from there.

MONTAGNE: Here’s something that’s interesting, something called the `hedonic treadmill,’ having to do with hedonism, right?

Mr. CLEMENTS: Right. I mean, the notion is that, you know, we all think, `OK, you know, if only we were richer, we’d be happier.
If only we got that next pay raise, we’d be happier.’ But what happens is you tend to get used to it after a while and so, you know, the boost to your happiness tends to fade away and after a couple of months you may feel little or no better off.

MONTAGNE: If it isn’t a pay raise or something kind of specific in time that can get you back to feeling happy, if you will, or content, what are the things that economics researchers and sociologists say will return you to a state of feeling content?

Mr. CLEMENTS: … one of the things that seems to have the biggest negative impact on people’s sense of well-being is a long commute.
Another thing that seems to be important is having job flexibility...
The other key thing is friends are a huge boost to happiness. If you spend your time seeing friends on a regular basis, you have a close-knit group of friends, that can really, really help.

related:
What Makes Us Happy At Work?
University of Kent
https://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/Choosing/career-satisfaction.htm

Hedonic treadmill
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedonic_treadmill

theme cited by:
Gamification
University of Pennsylvania
https://www.coursera.org/course/gamification

What is it called the analogous phenomenon in:
– student motivation?
– epistemic curiosity?
– love?

cf:
https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/remade-all-the-time-made-new