1% a day

How to achieve your greatness in life: Chatri Sityodtong at TEDxSingaporeManagementUniversity
Dec 17, 2013

Chatri Sityodtong is a self-made business leader, global investor, and motivational speaker. His lifelong passion for martial arts has seen him fight professionally in over 30 fights across different disciplines for over 20 years, and even open his own Mixed Martial Arts academy.

13:28 Try to improve yourself 1% a day every single day, so that you are better today than yesterday.
The power of self-improvement

[related: https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/what-have-you-done-of-meaning-today

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/01/28/oh-boy-what-can-i-accomplish-today]

16:23 Imagine a world where … everyone has a desire for continuous self-improvement

Great leadership starts with self-leadership | Lars Sudmann
TEDxUCLouvain

How do you inspire people to feel competent?

The psychology of self-motivation
Scott Geller
TEDxVirginiaTech, December 5, 2013

4:56 How do you inspire people to feel competent?
You give them feedback, you give them recognition. You show them they are competent.

when we feel related, connected to other people, we feel motivated.

perception of consequences

Job crafting

How To Build A Better Job
March 29, 2016
http://www.npr.org/2016/03/28/471859161/how-to-build-a-better-job

Why do you work? Are you just in it for the money or do you do it for a greater purpose? Popular wisdom says your answer depends on what your job is. But psychologist Amy Wrzesniewski at Yale University finds it may have more to do with how we think about our work. Across groups such as secretaries and custodians and computer programmers, Wrzesniewski finds people about equally split in whether they say they have a “job,” a “career” or a “calling.”
… how we find meaning and purpose at work.

Job crafting: what employees do to redesign their own jobs in ways that foster engagement at work, job satisfaction, resilience, and thriving.”
Berg, Wrzesniewski, & Dutton, 2010

November 10, 2014
Dr. Amy Wrzesniewski, professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management

Job crafting takes 3 forms:

  1. Task crafting: alter number, type, nature of tasks
  2. Relational crafting
  3. Cognitive crafting: alter how one perceives tasks and their meaning

===============

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/08/473277814/the-larger-than-life-legend-of-the-ballpark-aisles

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/the-exact-same-experience-good-or-bad-depending

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2016/06/28/person-environment-fit

cited by:

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2016/09/25/our-loss-of-wisdom

ABC of human motivation & video games

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What’s It Doing To Us?
February 11, 2013
http://www.npr.org/2013/02/11/171698919/video-game-violence-why-do-we-like-it-and-whats-it-doing-to-us

RPGs, or role-playing games. She says for the most part, they’re less violent than “first-person shooters” like Call of Duty.

If you want to create a good narrative, you need to create conflict, and violence is a really easy way to create conflict,” she says.

Iowa State University professor Douglas Gentile, who studies the effects of violent video games on children, says violent games tap into a primal instinct.
“There are two things that force us to pay attention,” Gentile says. “One is violence; the other is sex. Whenever either of those are present in our environment, they have survival value for us.”

Gentile explains that there is a very basic reason that a lot of people think violent games are more exciting than say, Tetris.

“These gamers do have an adrenaline rush, and it’s noradrenaline and it’s testosterone, and it’s cortisol — these are the so-called stress hormones,” Gentile says. “That’s exactly the same cocktail of hormones you drop into your bloodstream if I punched you.”
Getting punched in real life? Not fun.
“But when you know you’re safe, having that really heightened sense of stress can be fun,” Gentile says.

He says there’s an A, B and C of human motivations, and video games hit all three:

A is for Autonomy: “You’re holding a controller, so you are in control,” Gentile says.

B is for Belonging: “If you play with other people or have friends who play the same game or who play online, you also are meeting your belonging needs,” Gentile says.

And C is for competence: “[Games] often train you how to play as you’re playing, and so you start feeling competent,” Gentile says.

Which brings us to a decades-old question: Do violent video games make people more violent?

Gentile says that his research shows that children who play more violent games by and large behave more aggressively. But, he adds, that doesn’t necessarily mean school shootings.

VGS 54 – Dr. Douglas Gentile explains how violent video games affect the brain
May 6, 2016

~25 hostile attribution bias {because they’re friends}

~26 Games that don’t affect us: we call them boring

~27:30 immediate feedback
lots of opportunities for practice, with the goal that they master the skill -> it becomes automatic

31:30 pro-social games
Sims
animal crossing
community-building

Of course games affect us. When something doesn’t affect us, we call it “boring”