John Antonakis: Charisma matters

Let’s face it: charisma matters
John Antonakis
TEDxLausanne
charisma

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The riddle of experience vs. memory

Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory
TED2010
http://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_kahneman_the_riddle_of_experience_vs_memory
Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our “experiencing selves” and our “remembering selves” perceive happiness differently.

complexity

14:20 What controls satisfaction:
– money
– goals
– spending time with people we like

Elizabeth Loftus

How reliable is your memory?
Elizabeth Loftus
TED Jun 2013
http://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_loftus_the_fiction_of_memory

Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false memories, when people either remember things that didn’t happen or remember them differently from the way they really were. It’s more common than you might think, and Loftus shares some startling stories and statistics — and raises some important ethical questions.

Bouba/kiki effect

Bouba/kiki effect
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect

The bouba/kiki effect is a non-arbitrary mapping between speech sounds and the visual shape of objects. This effect was first observed by German-American psychologist Wolfgang Köhler in 1929.

The presence of these “synesthesia-like mappings” suggest that this effect might be the neurological basis for sound symbolism

also:

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2014/09/07/lyric_poem_advances_by_imagery

https://franzcalvo.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/vs-ramachandran-3-clues-to-understanding-your-brain-video

Expressive power of a language

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expressive_power_(computer_science)

related:
Does It Taste As Sweet To Say ‘I Love You’ In Another Language?
February 1, 2014
http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/02/01/269014409/does-it-taste-as-sweet-to-say-i-love-you-in-another-language
For intimate expressions — praying, lying, expressing anger, showing affection, even cursing — our native language is usually our strongest, says Boston University professor of psychology Catherine Harris.