Metagenomics: crAssphage

A highly abundant bacteriophage discovered in the unknown sequences of human faecal metagenomes
Bas E. Dutilh, et al.
Nature Communications 5, Article number: 4498 Published  24 July 2014
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140724/ncomms5498/full/ncomms5498.html

Metagenomics, or sequencing of the genetic material from a complete microbial community, is a promising tool to discover novel microbes and viruses.
Viral metagenomes typically contain many unknown sequences.

Here we describe the discovery of a previously unidentified bacteriophage present in the majority of published human faecal metagenomes, which we refer to as crAssphage.
Its ~97 kbp genome is six times more abundant in publicly available metagenomes than all other known phages together; it comprises up to 90% and 22% of all reads in virus-like particle (VLP)-derived metagenomes and total community metagenomes, respectively; and it totals 1.68% of all human faecal metagenomic sequencing reads in the public databases.
The majority of crAssphage-encoded proteins match no known sequences in the database, which is why it was not detected before.
Using a new co-occurrence profiling approach, we predict a Bacteroides host for this phage, consistent with Bacteroides-related protein homologues and a unique carbohydrate-binding domain encoded in the phage genome.

Subject terms: Biological sciences
Bioinformatics
Virology

http://www.npr.org/tags/172709084/microbiome

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