An App For Alcohol Withdrawal Tremor

Assessment of Alcohol Withdrawal Tremor in the Emergency Department
Aug 18, 2018

An App Can Reveal When Withdrawal Tremors Are Real
NPR. August 29, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/08/29/344232232/an-app-can-reveal-when-withdrawal-tremors-are-real

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Trans Fats Linger In Food

When Zero Doesn’t Mean Zero: Trans Fats Linger In Food
August 28, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/08/28/343971652/trans-fats-linger-stubbornly-in-the-food-supply

back in November 2013, the Food and Drug Administration announced it was intending to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products. The proposed ban seemed prudent, since eating foods with trans fats has been linked to heart disease, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that an FDA ban could prevent an additional 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year and as many as 20,000 heart attacks in that period.

But the FDA has yet to issue a final rule requiring food companies to eliminate trans fats entirely.

While many food companies have found affordable alternatives to partially hydrogenated oil, 1 in 10 packaged foods still contain it, according to researchers at the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

“A lot people think it’s out of the food supply, but it’s still in a lot of places,”

Peter Piot Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This
August 29, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2014/08/29/344257046/the-co-discoverer-of-ebola-never-imagined-an-outbreak-like-this

As a young scientist in Belgium, Peter Piot was part of a team that discovered the Ebola virus in 1976.

He took his first trip to Africa to investigate this mysterious disease.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, he met people who had contracted it. “I’ll never forget the glazed eyes, the staring and the pain … this type of expression in the eyes … telling me I’m going to die,” says Piot. “That I’ll never forget.”

Piot went on to study AIDS in the 1980s and became founding executive director of the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS.
He is now director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Chicken producers & salmonella (Aug. 2014)

How Foster Farms Is Solving The Case Of The Mystery Salmonella
August 28, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/08/28/342166299/how-foster-farms-is-solving-the-case-of-the-mystery-salmonella

Scientists have tested some flocks of chickens in the U.S. and Europe and found salmonella in anywhere from 7 to 70 percent of all live birds.

That’s disturbing, because people eventually will eat them. Fully cooking chicken does kill the bacteria. But if salmonella on raw chicken gets on your cutting board and then contaminates, say, some carrots, it can make you really sick.

chicken houses, for example, are designed to keep out wildlife, like mice or wild birds, that carry the bacteria. When chickens are slaughtered, the carcasses are washed with antimicrobial solutions.

According to USDA regulations, no more than 7.5 percent of the chicken carcasses coming from a chicken plant can test positive for salmonella.

last summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found evidence that chicken from Foster Farms had caused a wave of salmonella infections. More than 600 people had gotten sick.

they took samples of what most consumers actually buy: the cut-up parts, such as breasts, thighs and wings.
What they found is now shaking up the whole poultry industry. Their tests showed salmonella on about 25 percent of those cut-up chicken parts.

David Acheson, a former associate commissioner for foods at the Food and Drug Administration, says this pattern has been discovered at other poultry companies, too. Whole carcasses are largely free of salmonella, but then the bacteria appear on nearly a quarter of the chicken parts.

when they’re cut up into parts, they warm up about 10 degrees. That warmth may release salmonella that was trapped in skin pores of the chilled carcass.
If any salmonella bacteria are present, the process of cutting up the carcass may spread the microbes around, contaminating lots of chicken parts.

The share of chicken parts that tested positive for salmonella fell from 20 percent to less than 5 percent.

Others, like Seattle attorney Bill Marler, who makes his living suing companies when their food makes people sick, say it’s not good enough. “The standard is, it’s still OK to have a pathogen on your product that can sicken and kill your customers. And as long as that’s the way it is, we’re always going to limp from outbreak to outbreak to outbreak,” he says.

When the USDA declared these E. coli bacteria illegal adulterants in food, the meat industry complained, but it also found new ways to prevent them from poisoning people.

Eliminating salmonella altogether would be difficult — it’s much more common in the environment than disease-causing E. coli.

Mom’s Pregnancy Diet Rewires Baby’s Brain

Neonatal Insulin Action Impairs Hypothalamic Neurocircuit Formation in Response to Maternal High-Fat Feeding
Cell. Volume 156, Issue 3, p495–509, 30 January 2014
http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(14)00018-X

Highlights:
•Maternal HFD feeding during lactation impairs metabolic health of the offspring
•Maternal HFD during lactation impairs formation of melanocortin projections
•Abnormal insulin action in POMC neurons impairs POMC projections to preautonomic PVH
•Abrogating POMC insulin action improves glucose metabolism despite maternal HFD

Journalistic version:

Can Mom’s Pregnancy Diet Rewire Baby’s Brain For Obesity?
January 24, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/01/16/263110970/does-moms-pregnancy-diet-rewire-babys-brain-for-obesity

You are the product

Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?
by Anya Kamenetz
August 26, 2014
http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/08/26/341943780/is-googles-free-software-a-good-deal-for-educators

Another big concern is commercialization and student privacy. As Yeskel has mentioned in other interviews, Google’s business motive here is to expose young users to the Google brand. To hook them early.

Khaliah Barnes, director of the Student Privacy Project of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), warns, “When you’re using free services, if you don’t know what the product is, you are the product.”

In March, as part of a federal lawsuit, Google admitted it had been data-mining student email messages to potentially improve its targeted advertising, among other reasons. As of late April, says Yeskel, “We no longer show any ads to students or use any information in any other Google products. We take ownership of any user data extremely seriously.”